Paradox’s Victoria 3 artwork, concept art, and UI

Paradox’s Victoria 3 artwork, concept art, and UI

I Had Mixed Feelings About Paradox’s Latest Grand Strategy Game, Victoria 3, because for all the cool, funny, and interesting stuff he managed to pull off, he was just as much plagued with an obsession for really boring, broken stuff. One thing I loved in the beginning and will enjoy until the end of time is the art of the game.

As we have seen with Crusader Kings IIIWith its lavish loading screens and in-game artwork, the days of Paradox games delivered with disappointing art are long behind us. Victoria 3 is a lovely game to behold in almost every way, from its deeply appropriate menu interface to its 3D world map to the artwork that brings to life every crisis and decision you must face as the leader of a 19th century nation. As I said in my review:

Victoria 3The map of is magnificent, a globe bristling with color and variety and an ever-changing landscape as cities and railroads expand over the decades.

For tonight’s fine art, I’m thrilled to have the chance to showcase a ton of art for Victoria 3 of the bulk of the teams that worked on it, both from Paradox and outside studios. As such, you’ll find pieces from three disciplines below, starting with artwork, then environment art, and finally UI stuff.

Links to each individual artist’s portfolios can be found hyperlinked in their names below.


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Image: Paradox

Image for article titled The Art of Victoria 3

Image: Paradox

Image for article titled The Art of Victoria 3

Image: Paradox

Image for article titled The Art of Victoria 3

Image: Paradox

Image for article titled The Art of Victoria 3

Image: Paradox

Image for article titled The Art of Victoria 3

Image: Paradox

Image for article titled The Art of Victoria 3

Image: Paradox

Image for article titled The Art of Victoria 3

Image: Paradox

Image for article titled The Art of Victoria 3

Image: Paradox

Image for article titled The Art of Victoria 3

Image: Paradox

Image for article titled The Art of Victoria 3

Image: Paradox

Image for article titled The Art of Victoria 3

Image: Paradox

Image for article titled The Art of Victoria 3

Image: Paradox

Image for article titled The Art of Victoria 3

Image: Paradox

Image for article titled The Art of Victoria 3

Image: Paradox

Image for article titled The Art of Victoria 3

Image: Paradox

Image for article titled The Art of Victoria 3

Image: Paradox

Image for article titled The Art of Victoria 3

Image: Paradox

Image for article titled The Art of Victoria 3

Image: Paradox

Image for article titled The Art of Victoria 3

Image: Paradox

Image for article titled The Art of Victoria 3

Image: Paradox

Image for article titled The Art of Victoria 3

Image: Paradox

Image for article titled The Art of Victoria 3

Image: Paradox

Image for article titled The Art of Victoria 3

Image: Paradox

Image for article titled The Art of Victoria 3

Image: Paradox

Image for article titled The Art of Victoria 3

Image: Paradox

If you missed my review, aside from the visuals (which I’ve praised before and will do again now!), I’ve had the best of times with Victoria 3:

What you do on this political level, such as passing important new laws or pouring more money into services like education, is then reflected return about pop and the economy. It’s a huge feedback loop, where the slightest adjustment – maybe on what kind of furniture a factory makes, or how many fisheries you build in a state, or how much tax what you’re going to charge, or how expensive the paper is for your civil service – can have potentially huge economic and social ramifications.

Victoria 3 is constantly in motion, then, heaving and sighing, always moving under your feet. Numbers go in there, and they also come out the other side, but what you’re left with in the middle, once you understand them all, is something trying to come together the world. It’s seemingly endless with its possibilities, especially since you can control any nation (or comparable body) that existed in 1836, from European superpowers to the smallest fledgling state.

And also the worst moments:

Also, I never appreciated how much emphasis there is on economic management here. I know it’s the aim of the game, to show us how politics has as much to do with what we should eat as what we think about immigrants or public schools. But also, it’s a multi-faceted video game, featuring global diplomacy, societal storytelling, and the potential to reinvent World War I, but here I was spending most of my game time looking at the costs of the government paper and dye production and regions. livestock figures. The accountants and quartermasters among you may be very interested, but not me.

You can read the full review here.

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